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Safeguarding for parents

A guide for Parents if the school makes a referral

Child protection is everybody's business. The safety and welfare of children, or child protection, means protecting each and every child from emotional, physical and sexual abuse or neglect. Please take time to read our Safeguarding Policy.

If you have any concerns about a child please do not ignore these concerns. You can contact any professional involved with a child to discuss your concerns or you can talk to a local Social Work duty team. Information on how to do so can be found by following this link: “What to do if you're worried about a child”

Please understand that if a child tells an adult information that indicates that they might be at risk of being harmed then the school must share that information with the local Social Work duty team. We are in no way making a judgement and would attempt to make every effort to contact you in the first instance.

 

Milton Keynes Safegyuarding Children Board
www.mkscb.org

 

You can find out more information from the Milton Keynes Safeguarding Board website.

If you need help as a parent you should talk to a teacher, health visitor or doctor to find out what's available. They will be able to put you in touch with someone who can help.

Useful information leaflets

 

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Keeping Our Children Safe

Staff at St Bernadette’s are trained in safeguarding children. In addition to single-agency safeguarding training, they are also trained in signs, symptoms and appropriate responses regarding the Prevent Duty, Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE).

 

The Prevent Duty

The Prevent Strategy, published in 2011, is part of the government’s overall counterterrorism strategy, CONTEST. The aim of the Prevent strategy is to reduce the threat to the UK from terrorism by stopping people becoming terrorists or supporting terrorism. Section 26 of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015 (the Act) places a duty schools, to have “due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism”. At St Bernadette’s, we comply with this duty by providing a broad and balanced curriculum which promotes community cohesion, fundamental British values and the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of our pupils. Our Values driven curriculum prepares our pupils for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of life as they grow older and move on to secondary school.

At St Bernadette’s we will report any concerns we may have in order to prevent our children from being drawn into extremist ideology.

 

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http://www.st-michaels.enfield.sch.uk/_files/images/60516C7278E80E5A2C5F56467F17E063.jpg             

 

 

 

 

 

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) 

Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C) or

female circumcision, refers to a number of

practices which involve cutting away part or all

of a girl’s external genitalia for non-medical reasons. It is also known as female circumcision, cutting or sunna.

Religious, social or cultural reasons are sometimes given for FGM. However, FGM is child abuse. It is a dangerous and a criminal offence. It is illegal to carry out FGM in the UK or for a British citizen to be taken out of the UK for FGM to be performed. Through our Human Development and Relationships education, we teach our children about the natural human genitalia and use NSPCC resources to teach them that their “privates are private” – see resource below. At St Bernadette’s we will report any concerns we may have in order to protect girls from FGM. Since Oct 2015, we are required by law to report if we are informed by a girl that she has undergone an act of FGM, or if we observe physical signs that an act of FGM may have been carried out.

Religious, social or cultural reasons are sometimes given for FGM. However, FGM is child abuse. It is a dangerous and a criminal offence. It is illegal to carry out FGM in the UK or for a British citizen to be taken out of the UK for FGM to be performed. Through our Human Development and Relationships education, we teach our children about the natural human genitalia and use NSPCC resources to teach them that their “privates are private” – see resource below. At St Bernadette’s we will report any concerns we may have in order to protect girls from FGM. Since Oct 2015, we are required by law to report if we are informed by a girl that she has undergone an act of FGM, or if we observe physical signs that an act of FGM may have been carried out.

 

                                                                                               

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Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE)

Child sexual exploitation (CSE): involves exploitative situations, contexts

and relationships where young people receive something (for example food, accommodation, drugs, alcohol, gifts, money or in some cases simply affection) as a result of engaging in sexual activities. Sexual exploitation can take many forms ranging from the seemingly ‘consensual’ relationship where sex is exchanged for affection or gifts, to serious organised crime by gangs and groups. At St Bernadette’s we will report any concerns we may have in order to protect our children from CSE.

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Further advice and support

It is possible that your child or children have been allocated a social worker due to issues relating to a child protection concern or to undertake an assessment of their needs. Below are links to resources that may be useful to you in understanding how the child protection process works. You may want to seek advice and support from an independent organisation and there are links to the Family Rights Group and the NSPCC and further information.

 

 

Internet Safety

 

Visit www.kidsmart.org.uk
www.kidsmart.org.uk

 

There are loads of sites around that allow you to talk to other people on the web. Chat rooms and networks give you the chance to have a conversation with other people and get instant replies, while online message boards let you post up questions or comments and ask other users to give their opinion in their own time.

They can be a great way to communicate to other people who share your interests, but you should always be careful not to pass on any of your personal details. You should always keep in mind that Internet users can pretend to be anyone they like. They can lie about their age, their interests and whether they're male or female. No matter how long you've been chatting, remember that they're still strangers; you don't really know them at all.

Please take time to read our E- safety Policy.

We also have an Information Leaflet for Parents.

Social Networks

Some of you may have your own web page set up that lets you chat with friends or communicate with other users who share your interests. These 'social networks' also let you create your own blog, upload photos and videos for others to see, and add people to an online friends list.

Social networks are a great way of keeping in touch but you should think carefully before adding someone to your list of online friends or posting a blog entry that could get you into trouble at school, college or work. Remember that:

  • your page is still a public place, so putting anything on your page that you wouldn't want your parents, teacher  to see is not a good idea
  • you can never be sure that other users are being truthful about their online identities, so be careful about what information you give out
  • think about whether you know someone well enough before accepting someone into your group of linked friends
  • make sure you know who to contact to report abuse or bullying on your page and how your complaint will be dealt with and tell your parents.

Chat Rooms

To stay safe, make sure that when you're using a chat room or posting on a message board, you never give out any personal information like your address or your phone number. You should always use a nickname, so no-one can look you up in a telephone directory and get your home phone number. It’s usually not a good idea to arrange to meet up with someone that you've been chatting to online. Remember that you can never be sure that they're telling the truth about their age or their interests and you could be putting yourself in danger.

If you do want to meet up with someone you've met online, make sure that you discuss it with your parents beforehand. If they do agree, make sure that you arrange a meeting in a public place and that you take an adult with you.

Bullying

Bullies are very cunning and are expert at getting away with it.

As a Catholic School we believe every child is unique and made in God’s image. We all know that bullying goes on in every school but it's the way it's dealt with which makes the difference between life being tolerable or a misery. Bullying is hurtful and we will do our best to stop it. Helping children to recognise bullying is so important so please look through this guide with your child.

Bullying includes:

  • People calling you names
  • Making things up to get you into trouble
  • Hitting, pinching, biting, pushing and shoving
  • Taking things away from you
  • Damaging your belongings
  • Stealing your money
  • Taking your friends away from you
  • Posting insulting messages on the internet
  • Spreading rumours
  • Threats and intimidation
  • Making silent or abusive phone calls
  • Sending you offensive phone texts

Bullies can also frighten you so that you don't want to go to school, so that you pretend to be ill to avoid them.

How to solve the problem

If you are being bullied, tell a friend, tell a teacher and tell your parents. It won't stop unless you do. It can be hard to do this so if you don't feel you can do it in person it might be easier to write a note to your parents explaining how you feel, or perhaps confide in someone outside the immediate family, like a grandparent, aunt, uncle or cousin and ask them to help you tell your parents what's going on.

Your class teacher needs to know what is going on so try to find a time to tell her when it won't be noticeable. You could stay behind on the pretext of needing help with some work. Tell someone, often Teaching Assistants are available when your teacher is not.

The best idea is if a teacher can catch the bullies red-handed. That way, you won't get into bother from anyone for telling tales. It will be clear to everyone what has been going on. Don't be tempted to hit back because you could get hurt or get into trouble.

 
 
 

 

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